Category: Classical

Untitled - Colossamite - Economy Of Motion (CD, Album)

Comments

  1. Great album. My idea of "noise rock" is pretty vague and mostly has to do with guitar style(s), but these come to mind as favorites: Unwound, New Plastic Ideas. Colossamite, Economy of Motion (totally overlooked epic shit from the Deerhoof/Dazzling Killmen/etc. crowd) The Birthday Party, Junkyard. Thirty Ought Six, Hag Seed (it's noise-"emo," I.
  2. All My Love album for sale I first heard of Esteban while in a doctors office. After listening to a few minutes of his CD "All My Love", I knew I had to own this CD. The passion in Estebans guitar playing is so wonderful and real. His music speaks to you in a relaxing and somewhat sensual way.
  3. Sep 11,  · Economy of Motion, an Album by Colossamite. Released in on Skin Graft (catalog no. GR55CD; CD). Genres: Noise Rock, Math Rock/5(9).
  4. Oct 19,  · Economy of Motion is a pretty big step from 's All Lingo's Clamor EP in terms of pure aggression and abrasion -- Colosamite runs on 10 throughout the record, laying out hardcore noise and screamy chaos and anchoring them with Nick Sakes' (Dazzling Killmen) harsh mettbicicherfickcimaliscanerniho.coinfo compared to the roughness of Colosamite's previous releases, the record is on-the-edge and over-the .
  5. Colossamite was a mid-to-late s math rock band based in Minneapolis, mettbicicherfickcimaliscanerniho.coinfo were one of the most prominent exponents of the genre. Colossamite's members included Nick Sakes (vocals, electric guitar), Ed Rodriguez (electric guitar), John Dieterich (electric guitar), and Chad Popple (drum set); the group had no bass player. All except Sakes were transplanted Wisconsinites.
  6. Colossamite Colossamite was a mid-to-late s math rock band based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. They were one of the most prominentexponents of the mettbicicherfickcimaliscanerniho.coinfoamite's members included Nick Sakes (vocals, electric guitar), Ed Rodriguez (electric guitar), John Dieterich (electricguitar), and Chad Popple (drum set); the group had no bass player.
  7. "Face of Collapse" is near the top of my list (edged out only by "Economy of Motion" by Colossamite). In a way, Dazzling Killmen seemed to sum up a lot of the post rock/math rock sounds of the 90s (drop 'em in regular rotation alongside Jesus Lizard, Drive Like Jehu, and Fugazi, and you'll see what I mean).
  8. ‘I live in a hot house, get out’ bawls Nick Sakes in the first few seconds of opener ‘Hot House’, and these few seconds express the essence of Economy of Motion; tense, panic stricken and weirdly mettbicicherfickcimaliscanerniho.coinfo confrontational in a brutish way mind you, but more sort of suspicious; EoM comes out all yelpy and leering, swinging wildly like a drunk snake darting back and forth with.
  9. The absence of a bassist doesn’t create any added room: Colossamite’s trio of guitarists rain sheets of tone clusters, with Popple’s multiple time signatures adding a labyrinthine rhythmic dimension. It wasn’t until Economy of Motion that the group learned the benefits of space. Sakes’s vocals, normally difficult to discern, are up.

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